Claiming For PTSD Due To Sexual Abuse

Our guide explains how you can claim compensation for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from sexual abuse. Violent crimes can have a psychological impact in addition to physical injuries. We outline what post-traumatic stress disorder means and the circumstances in which it can occur. 

PTSD from sexual abuse

PTSD from sexual abuse guide

Additionally, we look at the various ways you can claim for sexual abuse and discuss the evidence that will be required when you do so. Our guide also details the difference in compensation values depending on the avenue you choose when claiming, exploring the Judicial College Guidelines and the tariff of injuries provided by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority

Moreover, we explain how compensation can be awarded and the factors that could affect the settlement you receive. Our guide also discusses the financial benefits of hiring a sexual assault solicitor on a No Win No Fee basis. 

To find out more about claiming for mental injuries from sexual abuse, please continue reading. If you require further legal advice, please reach us using the methods below: 

  • Call us on our number
  • Contact us by completing our website form
  • Speak with us using the live chat feature

Choose A Section

  1. Making A Claim For PTSD Due To Sexual Abuse – A Guide
  2. When Can You Claim For PTSD Due To Sexual Abuse?
  3. What Compensation Could You Receive From A Sexual Abuse Claim?
  4. What Evidence Do You Need To Claim For Sexual Abuse?
  5. Why Use Our Panel Of No Win No Fee Sexual Abuse Solicitors To Claim?
  6. Learn More About How To Claim Compensation For Abuse Victims

Making A Claim For PTSD Due To Sexual Abuse – A Guide

This guide details how to start a claim for PTSD from sexual abuse. The Sexual Offences Act 2003 defines various offences,  including rape, sexual assault, and child sexual abuse.

The NHS defines post-traumatic stress disorder as an anxiety disorder triggered by scary or distressing events. This disorder can cause insomnia, difficulty concentrating, and feelings of guilt. Complex PTSD can develop from repeated traumatic experiences such as prolonged abuse or violence.

There are numerous ways you could be able to claim for mental injuries caused by sexual abuse. We will take a look at exactly what these are in the next section. Otherwise, speak with a member of our team for free legal advice.

When Can You Claim For PTSD Due To Sexual Abuse?

When claiming for PTSD from sexual abuse, you can claim directly against the perpetrator, against a vicariously liable third party, or through the CICA. You can claim against the perpetrator if you know who they are and they have the funds available to compensate you. 

You may claim against third parties such as an employer or a school. For example, you may report a colleague’s sexually inappropriate behaviour toward you at work to your employer, and if nothing is done to address this, you could experience sexual assault at work for which they are liable. 

Alternatively, if neither of these methods is viable, you could claim through the CICA. This is an organisation sponsored by the government that administers a compensation scheme for victims of criminal injury in England, Scotland and Wales. The perpetrator does not have to be caught or identified in order for you to make a claim through the CICA.

There is a set of eligibility criteria you must meet to claim through the CICA:

  • You reported the incident to the police.
  • The claim is begun within the time limit.
  • The incident happened in England, Scotland, Wales, or another relevant place as defined by the CICA. 
  • The injuries are from a violent crime. The CICA’s definition of a violent crime includes sexual assault.

A member of our team could let you know whether you have a valid claim. If you do, they could provide you with a lawyer.

What Compensation Could You Receive From A Sexual Abuse Claim?

The Judicial College Guidelines offer compensation brackets that legal professionals can use to help decide the value of general damages. These figures should only be used as a guide as the figures are not definite. 

These guidelines are only applicable if you choose to claim against a vicariously liable third party or directly against the perpetrator. The CICA has a separate tariff that they use to value injuries. 

InjurySeverityNotesValue
Sexual AbuseSevere (a)There is serious abuse and severe psychiatric injury which affects daily life.£45,000 to £120,000
Sexual AbuseModerate (b)The abuse is less serious and the psychological reaction is less severe and has fewer effects on daily life.£20,570 to £45,000
Anxiety DisorderSevere (a)The effects are permanent and prevent the person from working. £59,860 to £100,670
Anxiety DisorderModerately Severe (b)The effects are likely to cause significant disability for the future but the prognosis is better.£23,150 to £59,860
Anxiety DisorderModerate (c)There is a large recovery and the effects are not grossly disabling.£8,180 to £23,150

General damages will aim to compensate you for the pain and suffering you have experienced due to your injuries. Special damages are different because they cover the financial losses you have incurred due to your injuries. 

Losses and evidence to accompany such include:

  • Payslips to show a loss of earnings
  • Public transport tickets to show travel costs
  • Bank statements or invoices to show the cost of home adaptations 

What Compensation Could You Receive When Making A Claim Through The CICA?

When claiming for PTSD from sexual abuse through the CICA, the compensation may differ from a claim against a vicariously-liable third party. The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme 2012 provides a tariff of injuries that outlines the fixed amounts assigned to numerous criminal injuries. 

If you sustain multiple injuries, you will be awarded compensation for three injuries from the main CICA tariff. These are subject to the following formula: 

  • You will receive 100% of the tariff settlement for your highest-valued injury. 
  • 30% of the compensation for your second-highest or equally valued injury.
  • 15% of the compensation for your third-highest or equally valued injury.

Additional payments can be made in the event that the assault caused a pregnancy, the loss of a foetus, or a sexually transmitted infection or disease. This will be awarded from a distinct tariff and so will be awarded in full; the formula above does not apply. 

Payouts provided by the CICA for criminal injuries are shown in the table below. This can be used as an alternative to a claim calculator

InjuryNotesValue
Mental InjuryThe injury is permanent and seriously disabling.£27,000
Mental InjuryThe injury is moderately disabling, permanent and confirmed by a psychiatrists diagnosis.£19,000
Mental InjuryThe injury is disabling, has been confirmed by a diagnosis of a psychiatrist, and is lasting five years or more.£13,500
Penetrative assault Causing diagnosed mental illness of a moderate nature £27,000
Penetrative assault Causing diagnosed mental illness of a moderate nature £22,000
Penetrative assault By two or more attackers £13,500
Penetrative assault By one attacker £11,000
Sexual AssaultA sexual assault that is severe involving non-penile penetrative or oral-genital acts.£3,300
Sexual AssaultA sexual assault that is serious involving non-penetrative sexual physical acts under clothing.£2,000
Sexual AssaultMinor- acts without penetration of a sexual nature over clothing. £1,000

Other Losses You May Be Able To Claim As Part Of Your Sexual Abuse Compensation

Special expenses are another payment you may receive during your claim for PTSD from sexual abuse. These cover losses such as: 

  • Equipment that was damaged in the incident which you rely on.
  • The cost of care related to your bodily functions, food preparation or supervision. 
  • Adaptations to your home or car.

You could also receive payment for a loss of earnings, but you must show that you could not work or had a very limited capacity to do so for 28 weeks. You will receive compensation from the 29th week onwards. 

The losses must be necessary, reasonable, and result directly from your injuries caused by the incident. 

What Evidence Do You Need To Claim For Sexual Abuse?

Evidence can support your claim. If you claim directly against the perpetrator or against a vicariously liable third party, the evidence will vary compared to this. 

When claiming through the CICA, you should provide the following evidence: 

  • Your police reference number
  • Proof that you meet the residency requirements 
  • Medical evidence

If the CICA requires any further information about your incident, they will acquire this through communications with the police. For example, they might need to confirm whether you have any criminal convictions that could impact your settlement. 

Why Use Our Panel Of No Win No Fee Sexual Abuse Solicitors To Claim?

When claiming for PTSD from sexual abuse, you may be interested in hiring a sexual abuse claims solicitor on a No Win No Fee basis. A popular type of this is a Conditional Fee Agreement. This means if your claim is unsuccessful, you generally won’t be required to pay for your solicitor’s services. You also won’t make upfront or ongoing payments. 

Your solicitor will take a success fee if your claim is successful. This is a deduction from your compensation legally capped by the Conditional Fee Agreements Order 2013.

Please contact us for free legal advice if you have any queries about No Win No Fee agreements.

Want To Know If You Can Make A Sexual Abuse Claim? Contact Us For Free Today

If you require further information about claiming for mental injuries from sexual abuse, please do not hesitate to reach us. We are here to help and provide legal advice. 

You can reach us in the following ways:

  • Call us on our number
  • Complete our online form to contact us 
  • Speak with us using the live chat feature

Learn More About How To Claim Compensation For Abuse Victims

Thank you for reading our guide on claiming for PTSD from sexual abuse. If you found our guide useful, you can find more of our information linked below: 

For further guidance, please visit the external sites listed below: 

Writer Emily Marley

Publisher Fern Scrimshaw